Why you can not carry more than 100ml. on the plane?


Do you know ?

'Why you can not carry more than 100ml. on the plane?'


  

  Many people may already know. But for beginner travelers, there is no doubt that it is forbidden to carry more than 100 ml of liquids on a carry-on bag? Be it water, cream, skin lotion. Or even spray deodorant is still prohibited! But soon ... Do not get upset or upset. Because all the taboo subject is always rational. That's because the safety of everyone on the flight. Include your own. Today we will take a look at the source. Why are airlines so restrictive?...

  

 

  Limit measures to hold the liquid on the machine. Intensive after September 11, 2001. There are terrorists hijacking planes. To use as a terrorist vehicle After that event Make countries take measures to check weapons. And limited liquids are expected to be used in aircraft suicide bombers. Used to date

 

  Until December 2009 Unexpected events happen. When Abdul Farouqar Abu Mulatto secret Sneaky chemicals and liquids in the air. To try to bomb an airplane carrier in Europe. There was a burst of flames and flames flooding his legs. After that, the other passengers took hold of him. Before the Great Tragedy

 

 The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) has issued a rule prohibiting the introduction of more than 100 mL of liquid. To prevent repeat history. Because this quantity is too small to be used as a component of a bomb. If you try to make a bomb, you will have to gather 10 people from the other machine to do it, but it will be easy to observe. That's why. 'Why are airlines so strict about bringing liquid on board?' Even if you use less than 100 ml, if the package says more than 100 ml, you can not bring it up. Because safety must be number one!

 

Liquid excluded : Milk, baby food and medicine (In the right amount), which must be authorized by the employee at the raid point, liquid purchased from Duty Free. Because it was properly checked and packaged.

 

Credit : http://mcot-web.mcot.net  





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